Monday, September 12, 2011

Romance Novels for the Baby Boomer Over 40s 'An Emerging Genre'


The news is finally getting out. 

As Lulu (62), Nancy Dell'Olio (50), Edwina Currie (64) and Anita Dobson (62) dust off their dancing shoes for  Strictly Come Dancing, The Sunday Times' Eleanor Mills says that this summer has been awash with tales of bionic, sexually out there baby
boomers:

"Last week we had a British 65-year-old getting a boob job to perk herself up, hot on the heels of the 83-year-old American great-granny who had done the same thing. The bedroom antics of 78-year-old Joan Collins and the workout videos and (more) saucy memoirs of 73-year-old Jane Fonda received plenty of column inches...."

But, she says, this is not removing age-discrimination against women on TV by a long shot. We all love Strictly, but where are the programmes where intelligent, articulate women like Pamela Stephenson and Anne Widdicombe show off their brainpower rather than their legs?

The way TV presenters Arlene Phillips, Anna Ford, Moira Stuart, Miriam O'Reilley have all been pushed sideways when they get to a certain age is an on-going topic. More interestingly, Eleanor flags up a new "emerging literary genre" that celebrates the romantic adventures of baby boomers.

At...

Last.

One of her favourite summer reads was Thursdays In The Park (Quercus) by Hilary Boyd, currently sitting at 720 in the Kindle charts. Ulrika Jonsson's The Importance of Being Myrtle (Penguin Sept 11) is at no 800, and I've heard gossip that Anna Wintour has a novel (not sure if it's written yet) about a group of 50something women that they're all getting excited about. Hurrah for these well-connected authors (weather reporters, magazine editors whatever) who have got their ideas through the mire of publishing prejudice against over 40s romance novels.  Long-time readers of this blog might remember what happened to Ten Good Reasons when it jumped the agent/editor hoops only to be ditched by a Big 6 sales & marketing team all those years ago. Hopefully these new novels might kick the genre into gear for the rest of us.

Bye bye, thanks for visiting, come again soon. 






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